In your search for quality winter boots, finding the warmest may be a priority. Whether it’s a question of comfort or necessity because of where you live, it can be hard to find genuinely warm winter boots.

After testing a number of winter and snow boots, we’ve found the definitively Warmest Winter Boots For Men that you can buy online:

  1. Hiking Boot: Irish Setter Elk Tracker
  2. Moon Boot: Tecnica Nylon
  3. Duck Boot: Sorel Caribou
  4. Walking Boot: New Balance BM1000v1
  5. Walking Boot: The North Face Snowfuse
  6. Blucher Boot: UGG Hannen TL
  7. Work Boot: Wolverine Glacier Ice Durashock
  8. Blucher Boot: Johnston & Murphy Shearling

Like something you see listed above? Use the links to jump straight to them! We’ll also quickly cover the ways boots are insulated to keep your feet warm.

men skiing in their underwear

wolf & shepherd banner

Beckett-Simonon-Ethical-Ad-2

Quick Buyer’s Guide

In a hurry and just want to pick up some quality boots? Use the Quick Buy Guide below to be directed straight to the retailers. Otherwise, scroll down to learn more about them if time is on your side.

Hiking Boot

Irish Setter Elk Tracker 12 Inch Hiking Boot

Shop

Moon Boot

Tecnica Moon Snow Boot Nylon

Shop

Duck Boot

Sorel-Caribou-Wool-Boot

Shop

Walking Boot

New Balance BM1000v1 Snow Boot

Shop

Walking Boot

The North Face Snowfuse Boot

Shop

Blucher Boot

UGG Hannen TL Winter Boot

Shop

Work Boot

Wolverine Glacier Ice Carbonmax Snow Work Boot

Shop

Blucher Boot

Johnston & Murphy Forrester Shearling Boot

Shop

See Our Ultimate Guide To Winter Boots

Read Now

What Are The Warmest Winter Boots For Men?

Advert Title Text Banner Zappos Mobile Link Block Ad

1. Irish Setter Elk Tracker 12″ Boots [Hiking Boots]

Irish Setter Elk Tracker 12 Inch Hiking Boot
Shop Now

Overview

Red Wing’s seasonal brand, Irish Setter, have used Thinsulates’s whopping 1000g 3M Thinsulate ultra to line these boots. This paired with a Gore-Tex membrane and Goodyear leather welt, they keep your feet warm and dry in even the harshest weather.

How To Wear

Great for hunting, hiking or working in the yard, these are pedigree outdoor boots. However, they’re also very stylish and would go well with a number of rustic, countryside wardrobes. Just bear in mind their 12″ height, which is quite impressive and can take a good deal of leg-space!

Best Colors

Available only in a brown full-grain leather, this isn’t much of a disappointment as the boot design seems to be made for this colour.

Also Featured In

2. Tecnica Nylon [Moon Boots]

Tecnica Moon Snow Boot Nylon
Shop Now

Overview

These may look daft but you wanted to warmest winter shoes, right? With their low price, they offer excellent value with high-quality foam insulation as well as a TR rubber outsole for traction and waterproofing. They tighten onto your legs using wraparound lacing for a secure fit.

How To Wear

These are boots designed for heavy snowfall so it might be overkill if you go out into your local neighbourhood when there’s just a thin coating. They’re quite cumbersome and conspicuous so it’s something we’d probably reserve for when they’re necessary or when on a ski holiday.

Best Colors

It’s a shame that these are only available in burgundy as the nylon upper could easily be available in a whole rainbow of colours. So burgundy it is!

Also Featured In

3. Sorel Caribou [Insulated Duck Boots]

Sorel-Caribou-Wool-Boot
Shop Now

Overview

From the makers of the original duck boot come these lambswool-insulated creations. Very cosy and able to withstand temperatures as low as -40°C / -40°F, they’re ideal for when out and about during winter’s peak.

How To Wear

Thanks to a pebbled leather upper, they’re actually quite stylish and easy to wear when running errands or during your commute. Whilst you can pair them with conventional clothes for the cold, they also look fine with denim.

Best Colors

We find that the tobacco brown pebbled leather is by far the best choice and easiest to wear. Meanwhile, there’s a black choice, which may suit other wardrobes but we find the brown is generally the easiest to integrate.

Also Featured In

4. New Balance BM1000v1 [Walking Boots]

New Balance BM1000v1 Snow Boot
Shop Now

Overview

Thanks to the brand’s proprietary NBHeat technology, these are very cosy during the cold weather. Furthermore, a nylon shank ensures extra stability whilst the fresh foam midsole adds extra cushion and all-day comfort.

How To Wear

Although they’re walking boots, their contemporary design makes them more urban-friendly for wearing in towns and cities. Therefore, if the more rustic designs featured here put you off, this would be one of our first choices. They also pair well with modern wardrobes and styling.

Best Colors

Our favourite colour combination is the dark green and orange two-tone, which is very modern and has a slight pop to it. Nevertheless, there are other possibilities such as grey or brown, which are more subdued.

Also Featured In

5. The North Face Snowfuse [Hybrid Boot]

The North Face Snowfuse Boot
Shop Now

Overview

With a lightweight EVA shell that can withstand -25°F / -32°C temperatures, these are an attractive option. Firstly, their low profile may be more convenient for some people. Furthermore, their hybridised design offers benefits of both duck boots and walking boots.

How To Wear

These are very versatile winter boots that wouldn’t look out of place in either the city or the countryside. Paired with regular clothing or outfits for cold temperatures, they blend in well and give you extra flexibility thanks to the low profile.

Best Colors

There’s a ganache brown, which features subtle green accents. However, we prefer the black as they seem more in line with urban styling.

Also Featured In

6. UGG Hannen TL [Blucher Boots]

UGG Hannen TL Winter Boot
Shop Now

Overview

The iconic Australian brand has made these durable men’s blucher boots for a more stylish masculine option. Thanks to the UGGpure lining, they can be worn in temperatures of -20°C / -4°F. Furthermore, there’s some great traction thanks to the brand’s Treadlite soles.

How To Wear

Ideal for walking around town, these are casual boots that can also be incorporated into business casual attire too. We’d comfortably wear them with denim, chinos or even corduroy as well as a comfortable Puffa jacket or sport coat.

Best Colors

We’re quite fond of the Cordovan brown colour as a versatile and casual option. However, the black boots would work well in the office and may come in handy if you have to commute through the cold.

Also Featured In

7. Wolverine Glacier Ice Durashock [Work Boot]

Wolverine Glacier Ice Carbonmax Snow Work Boot
Shop Now

Overview

Wolverine’s winter variant of the Legend Durashocks are tough and ASTM F2413 approved. If you’re working on-site through the hard winter, you can do far worse than these. Thanks to the Vibram Arctic Grip you won’t be breaking your face when trudging across slippery environments.

How To Wear

Even as casual winter boots, these are solid candidates and would be great to wear casually. Whilst this comes to personal preference, we’d say that they’re a no-brainer for contractors.

Best Colors

There’s a black option but our favourites are easily the brown thanks to the vintage-inspired distressed suede leather. This is going to be much easier to wear casually whilst the black boots might be tough to integrate into your wardrobe.

Also Featured In

8. Johnston & Murphy Shearling [Blucher Boot]

Johnston & Murphy Forrester Shearling Boot
Shop Now

Overview

A stunning boot from Johnston & Murphy’s 1850 Collection, these are probably our favourites even if they’re in the eighth position. Thanks to the genuine shearling leather, they’re very warm and the crepe rubber sole offers solid traction. A storm welt also provides waterproofing and recrafting.

How To Wear

These are among the most stylish winter boots we’ve seen and are great to wear for work. They’re perfect for business casual attire but could also be worn with a rather laid-back style of suit.

Best Colors

Only brown is available for this boot and it’s somewhat a shame that no brown option exists for more formal wear. Nevertheless, this would be a top pick for the office during winter.

Also Featured In

How Winter Boots Are Insulated For Warmth

Choosing the right boots can be challenging when considering the various types of insulation used in their lining. You’ll see words like “Thinsulate”, “Primaloft” or even weights like “200g” thrown around but without much explanation.

In this part of our guide, we’ll talk about the types of insulation that are used to make particularly warm boots.

Waterproof Membrane

boot with light coating of waterOne of the first lines of defence is a layer of material that will act as a membrane to prevent your feet from being exposed to the harsh winter elements. There are a number of materials that can be used either individually or together to this effect.

More often than not, these will offer some sort of waterproofing or water resistance for your winter boots. One of the first common materials is leather, which is often found on more traditional boots.

Although leather is naturally porous, it also offers a certain degree of water resistance. This level of resistance is dependant on both the quality and grade of leather as well as the way it’s been treated.

For instance, full-grain leather is known for its tight fibres, which have many unique properties. Firstly, it’s very robust and hard-wearing. However, it also retains its shape and the tighter fibres means that they’re naturally more water resistance. Yet the feet are still able to breathe.

Nevertheless, most winter boots will use synthetic materials like treated nylon as well as Gore-Tex. The latter is a well-known brand for having commercialised a waterproof and breathable membrane made from stretched polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE).

Although these materials don’t insulate from heat, they do act as a vital barrier. Should they be compromised, not only will heat escape from the insulation but it will also become less effective when humid.

Heat-Retaining Materials

synthetic fur fabricThere are a number of brands who boast various patented materials and techniques for providing insulated lining for garments and boots. Whilst much of it plays a large marketing role, there is often truth to their claims.

Many of these brands tend to use types of polyester in the form of fake fur. Overall, this tends to work quite well. For instance, Primaloft uses hollow polyester fibres, which can be compress and are resistant to water.

Meanwhile, leading brand Thinsulate has devised a synthetic fibre, which is much thinner than polyster. Made from different blends of polymers such as polyethylene terephthalate, their fibres re 15 micrometers in diameter.

Smaller fibres means that there are more gaps between them, which reduces heat flow and allows moisture to escape rather than build up.

Natural Fibres

These all perform well and tend to be cheaper than natural materials. Nevertheless, nothing beats the real thing. Materials like cashmere tend to be too expensive to use on boots but lambswool is a popular choice.

Lambswool is 50mm shorter and is the first shearing from a sheep at around the age of 7 months. The advantage of lambswool is that it has the same properties of Thinsulate in that the heat flow is reduced but breathes to let moisture escape.

However, this happens naturally thanks to its soft, elastic and thick properties.

Otherwise, there is also shearling leather. Unlike wool, which is shorn from a sheep, shearling is the hide itself. This type of leather is usually made from a recently shorn sheep or lamb and then is tanned and treated with the wool still attached.

Furthermore, genuine shearling is tends to be much more supple than using an insulating material as well as a membrane. This is because the lining is naturally rooted into the leather itself.

Insulation Weights & What They Mean

Bearded Man In Snow With Frozen BeardYou’ll often see metric weights attributed to the insulation type of your boots or garment. In fact, Thinsulate is the brand most associated with this.

Insulation weight simply refers to the grams per square metre (gsm). Typically, they range from 40 all the way up to 1200. In short, this indicates the thickness of the textile’s fbres.

Using Thinsulate as a benchmark, they tend to market their fibres thus:

  • 40 grams: Best for temperatures as low as 40°F / 5°C
  • 80 – 100 grams: Ideal for temperatures above freezing.
  • 100 – 400 grams: Suitable for temperatures as low as 20°F / -6°C
  • 400 – 600 grams: Acceptable for temperatures around 10°F / -12°C
  • 600 – 800 grams: Best reserved for temperatures below 0°F / -20°C
  • 800 grams and above: For temperatures below the above.

Although it’s rare, you’ll sometimes see the same vocabulary used with natural fibres. However, it tends to be reserved and marketed for synthetic ones.

Finally, note that using too much insulation will ironically make your feet too cold if you are very active when wearing them.

If they produce too much sweat with the abundance of heat, there risks being too much moisture that can escape. Consequently, the sweat will cool and you’ll get cold feet. Keep this in mind when buying the right boots for your climate.

However, if you’re standing still for long periods of time (such as fishing or hunting), it’s worth considering the heavier types of insulation to provide extra warmth.

What Next?

Having now explored the warmest winter boots for men, consider checking out some of our related shoe and boot guides:

Warmest Winter Boots Guide
Reviewed by Colin R., on .
"Nice and cosy. My feet will be comfortable and toasty come winter thanks to these boots."
Rating: 5.0 ★★★★★

Shoe Content

Shoe-Homepage Shoe-Style-Guides Shoe-Color-Coordination Shoe-Care-Button Shoe-Reviews