Often overshadowed by its better-known neighbours, Honduras hosts a rich variety of excellent cigars.

In this guide, you will discover our top choices of the Best Honduran Cigars:

  1. Plasencia Cosecha 146
  2. Camacho Nicaraguan Barrel Aged
  3. Rocky Patel Number 6
  4. Alec Bradley Black Market
  5. Punch Gran Puro
  6. Maya Selva Flor De Selva
  7. Rocky Patel Decade
  8. Camacho Connecticut
  9. CAO Brazilia
  10. Asylum13

You can use the links above to jump ahead. You can also head to the menu below to see we cover.

Plasencia 146 Cosecha Cigar Review

What Are The Best Honduran Cigars?

Before you discover our selection of the best Honduran cigars, please note that the following isn’t an exhaustive list. However, it offers an overview of some of its most recommended blends.

Similarly, feel free to leave a comment if you have a personal favourite or feel that we left something out!

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1. Plasencia Cosecha 146

Plasencia 146 Cosecha Cigar Second Third
  • Filler: Nicaraguan & Honduran Criollo ’98
  • Binder: Nicaraguan Criollo ’98
  • Wrapper: Honduran Criollo ’98
  • Preferred Vitola: 5 x 50 “La Música” Robusto
  • Assembly: Tabacos de Oriente, Honduras
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Mild – Medium
  • Smoking Time: 65 Minutes
  • Pricing: $12 / Single
Read The Review

Named after Plasencia’s 146th crop, this cigar is only composed of Criollo ’98 tobacco that was grown in Honduras as well as the family’s own fields in Nicaragua.

It was then assembled at Plasencia’s Honduran Tabacos de Oriente in Danlí. The result is a wonderfully spicy blend with notes of salted caramel, cinnamon, rosewood, and nutmeg.

"A wonderful specimen that showcases Honduran craftsmanship and its characteristic flavours."
Bespoke Unit Rating: ★★★★★

2. Camacho Nicaraguan Barrel Aged

Camacho Nicaraguan Barrel Aged Cigar First Third
  • Filler: Honduran, Nicaraguan Corojo, Pilot Cubano and Dominican San Vicente Blend
  • Binder: Mexican
  • Wrapper: Ecuadorian Habana 2000
  • Preferred Vitola: 6″ X 50 Gauge Toro
  • Assembly: Honduras
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Medium – Full
  • Smoking Time: 80 Minutes
  • Pricing: $12 / Single [Shop Now]
Read The Review

After being aged for 6 years, this cigar blend earned its name by maturing its Corojo leaf for an additional 5 months in Nicaraguan rum barrels. Consequently, it produces wonderfully caramelised flavours.

However, the tobacco was infused so it doesn’t have a distinctively rum-like flavour. Instead, it imparts subtle hints that contributes to its overall complexity.

3. Rocky Patel Number 6

Rocky Patel Number 6
  • Filler: Nicaragua, Honduras
  • Binder: Honduras
  • Wrapper: Honduras
  • Preferred Vitola:6 x 44 Corona
  • Assembly: El Paraiso, Danlí, Honduras
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Full
  • Smoking Time: 95 Minutes
  • Pricing: $9 / Single
Review Coming Soon

Very nearly a Honduran puro, there’s just a little extra Nicaraguan tobacco in the filler to impart a subtle hint of spice. The Number 6 by Rocky Patel feature a Corojo-seed wrapper and uses tobacco sourced from the Plasencia family.

The resulting blend reveals hints of cocoa, orange peel, whiffs of black pepper, and a vanilla finish.

4. Alec Bradley Black Market

Alec Bradley Black Market Cigar With Diplomatico Rum
  • Filler: Honduran Jamastran Valley, Panama
  • Binder: Ecuadorian Sumatra
  • Wrapper: Nicaragua
  • Preferred Vitola: 6 x 50 Toro
  • Assembly: Tabacos de Oriente, Danlí, Honduras
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Medium – Full
  • Smoking Time: 80 Minutes
  • Pricing: $9 / Single
Read The Review

Although the Estelí version of Alec Bradley’s Black Market is often regarded as a better choice, the original is made in Plasencia’s Honduran factory. Opulent yet flavoursome, it’s a characterful cigar that produces a diverse tableau of notes.

With additional tobacco from Nicaragua, Ecuador, and Panama, it showcases Jamastran Valley leaf from Honduras.

5. Punch Gran Puro

Punch Gran Puro
  • Filler: Honduras
  • Binder: Honduras
  • Wrapper: Honduras
  • Preferred Vitola: 4.5 x 52 “Santa Rita” Robusto
  • Assembly: Honduras American Tobacco factory (HATSA)
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Mild
  • Smoking Time: 55 Minutes
  • Pricing: $5 / Single
Review Coming Soon

When Fernando Palicio fled Cuba, he settled in Florida and sold the Punch name to Villazon & Co. who continued to make it as well as Hoyo de Monterrey from Honduran tobacco for the American market.

Today, it is operated by the General Cigar Company. Although it has a plethora of fascinating blends, the Gran Puro best highlights the milder qualities of Honduran tobacco.

As the name suggests, it’s a puro made just from local leaf and is retailed at a very attractive price.

6. Maya Selva Flor De Selva

Maya Selva Flor de Selva
  • Filler: Honduran Viso Jamastran, Ligero Azacualpa
  • Binder: Honduras Habano Jamastrán
  • Wrapper: Honduras Talanga Connecticut Seed
  • Preferred Vitola: 6 x 43 “El Galán” Diademas
  • Assembly: Honduras
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Medium
  • Smoking Time: 75 Minutes
  • Pricing: $9 / Single
Review Coming Soon

Born from a French mother and Honduran father, Maya Selva imparts a touch of Parisian elegance onto her creations.

Released in 1995, the Flor de Selva is a fascinating Honduran puro that continues to subvert expectations by producing a smooth and relatively mild experience. It’s composed with a Honduran-grown Connecticut seed wrapper as well as a Cuban seed binder.

7. Rocky Patel Decade

Rocky Patel Decade Cigar Look & Feel
  • Filler: Nicaragua
  • Binder: Nicaragua
  • Wrapper: Ecuadorian Sumatra
  • Preferred Vitola: 6.5 x 52 Toro
  • Assembly: El Paraiso Danlí, Honduras
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Full
  • Smoking Time: 95 Minutes
  • Pricing: $14 / Single
Read The Review

Initially released as a limited edition to celebrate Rocky Patel’s 10-year anniversary, the Decade is now part of its regular line-up.

A surprisingly fruity cigar, the Decade features hints of damson plum in the first third as well as black cherry in the second. However, it’s largely a gourmand experience with notes of cacao and coffee grounds.

8. Camacho Connecticut

Camacho Connecticut Robusto Box Pressed & Espresso
  • Filler: Generoso, Aleman, & Broadleaf
  • Binder: Authentic Corojo
  • Wrapper: Ecuadorian Connecticut
  • Preferred Vitola: 5 x 50 BxP Robusto
  • Assembly: Diadema Cigars [Honduras]
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Mild – Medium
  • Smoking Time: 50 Minutes
  • Pricing: $8 / Single [Buy Now]
Read The Review

As part of Camacho’s Bold Everyday Smoke range, the Connecticut is verbose and robust, especially for a Connecticut cigar.

Overall, we prefer the box-pressed version, which also includes American broadleaf in the filler. Consequently, we find that it offers a much richer experience with additional herbaceous and creamy notes.

9. CAO Brazilia

CAO Brazilia
  • Filler: Honduras
  • Binder: Honduras
  • Wrapper: Brazil
  • Preferred Vitola: 6 x 60 “Amazon” Toro
  • Assembly: Honduras
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Medium-Full
  • Smoking Time: 95 Minutes
  • Pricing: $6 / Single
Review Coming Soon

Assembled in Honduras rather than C.A.O.’s Nicaraguan factory, this blend celebrates Brazil’s often overlooked tobacco heritage. It offers an earthy and opulent experience with distinctive full-bodied flavours.

10. Asylum13

Asylum13 Cigar & Brugal Leyenda Rum
  • Filler: Nicaraguan Cuban-Seed
  • Binder: Nicaragua
  • Wrapper: Nicaraguan Habano
  • Preferred Vitola: 8 x 80 Gordo
  • Assembly: CLE Cigars [Danlí, Honduras]
  • Handmade: Yes
  • Body: Medium
  • Smoking Time: 100 Minutes
  • Pricing: $11 / Single
Review Coming Soon

Founded by Tom Lazuka and Christian Eiroa, Asylum13 dared to venture into unapologetically large ring gauges. The result is behemoths that include the 8 x 80 Gordo! Needless to say, the Asylum13 is an entertaining smoke!

Although a Nicaraguan puro, it’s manufactured in Honduras. Meanwhile, you can instead opt for smaller vitolas. However, where would the fun be in that?

Honduran Cigar Characteristics

Rocky Patel Decade Cigar Presentation

Honduras has a long history of cultivating tobacco. As you’ll later in this guide, the Spanish had been developing its industry since the mid-18th century. However, it has often been overshadowed by its neighbours like Nicaragua, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic.

For most of its history, Honduran tobacco was exported in its raw form to Europe and North America. For instance, the vast majority of factories that assembled cigars from Honduras were based in Tampa, Florida.

Demand for Honduran tobacco increased following the Cuban Revolution. Many of the tobacco producers that fled Cuba settled in Honduras to cultivate seeds that they had smuggled out of the country. For this reason, much of today’s Honduran tobacco is derived from Cuban varieties.

Similarly, Cuban cigar manufacturers established new factories in Florida and since Cuban tobacco was inaccessible, they turned to Honduras’ production.

Honduras witnessed another spike in production during Nicaragua’s Sandinista Revolution. A large portion of both Cuban and native Nicaraguan cigar producers fled the conflict by crossing the border into Honduras.

For instance, the prevalent Plasencia family moved to Danlí in 1985 where they established a new factory. Starting with just 5 rollers, Plasencia now makes over 35 million cigars a year. Although it eventually returned to Nicaragua, 60% of its total production continues in Honduras.

Honduran Tobacco Regions

Curing Tobacco Leaves In The Shade

Much of the Honduran tobacco production takes places in the area along the Jamastrán Valley between Danlí and the Nicaraguan border. Indeed, this region is an extension of Nicaragua’s Jalapa Valley and features similar geography.

The greatest concentration of farms are in the province of El Paraiso and while the majority of factories are near Danlí, some can also be found there, too. El Paraiso grows a wide variety of tobacco but is also known for Connecticut shade-grown wrappers.

Meanwhile, the central Talanga Valley is a mountainous region northwest of Danlí. It is known for its sun-grown tobacco, which is produced using transparent “encallado” tents to protect the leaves from the high winds.

Finally, the Copán region near the Guatemalan border is a historical tobacco-growing site. It was popularised by the Spanish in the mid-18th century and has retained a presence near Santa Rosa.

Honduran Tobacco Varieties

Typically, Honduras’ production consists of Cuban seed tobacco varieties. In many cases, they have been hybridized in order to better adapt to Honduras’ soil and climate. The most popular varieties are Corojo and Criollo.

These potent types of tobacco are usually sun-grown but Corojo can be cultivated as shade tobacco. Similarly, Honduras has a major Connecticut shade-grown industry, too.

Honduran Cigar Flavour Profile

Camacho Corojo Cigar Review

Honduran cigars are often associated with distinctively bold flavours. While this assumption is true to a certain extent, you will have noticed in the list above that the country hosts a dynamic variety of cigars.

Nevertheless, the country’s soil and climate will impart certain flavours. For example, it may impart somewhat earthy and spicy flavours in some cases. However, since Honduran tobacco can also be shade-grown, it can also be mild and creamy.

Needless to say, Honduran cigars far exceed their reputation and are often underestimated for both the quality and diversity that they can provide.

How Did We Rank These Cigars?

Alec Bradley Black Market Cigar On Stone Wall

All the cigars listed above have been fully-reviewed or at least formally tested using the Bespoke Unit Cigar Formula. This quantifiable review matrix was developed in order to create a fair and balanced methodology.

We first tested this standardised model with our review of the Avo Nicaragua in August 2019. Since then, it has been carefully revised and optimised in order to improve its accuracy.

Therefore, rest assured that the cigars featured here were thoughtfully curated rather than chosen by random.

What Next?

Firstly, did we miss anything out? Feel free to let us know in the comments below! Otherwise, now that you’ve seen the best Honduran cigars, why don’t you also check out our related guides below?

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